Mississippi

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Top 10 Fishing Destinations in Mississippi

Mississippi’s coastline stretches for 44 miles along the beautiful Gulf of Mexico, and its unique combination of freshwater, brackish water, and saltwater makes this state home to hundreds of species of fish, including numerous trophy fish. The upper Mississippi River alone has over 120 species of fish. But even with these hundreds of species, the state fish remains the humble but tenacious largemouth bass.

Whether you’re a shore, pier, boat, or deep-sea fisherman, you are sure to find plenty of great fishing spots in the Hospitality State.


Types of Catch Available

Freshwater

raindbow trout

Rainbow Trout

Largemouth Bass

Largemouth Bass

smallmouth bass

Smallmouth Bass

spotted bass

Spotted Bass

Striped Bass

White Bass

White Bass

northern pike

Northern Pike

walleye

Walleye

bullhead catfish

Bullhead Catfish

Bluegill

Bluegill

yellow perch

Yellow Perch

Crappie

Crappie

Channel Catfish

Channel Catfish

Carp

State Fishing Records

Top 10 Fishing Spots Across Mississippi

Mississippi Gulf Coast

Mississippi Gulf Coast

The Mississippi Gulf Coast is an excellent fishing spot for anglers of all levels. You can catch some enormous game fish here, including king mackerel, striped mullet, red drum, vermillion snapper, gray snapper, lane snapper, and Spanish mackerel. The list of species that dwell in these waters just goes on and on.

The water ranges from freshwater to brackish to saltwater, and there are over two hundred species of fish available to be caught. The Mississippi Gulf Coast is an excellent place for pier fishing, wade fishing, or deep-sea fishing.


Ross Barnett Reservoir

Ross Barnett Reservoir

Ross Barnet is one of the best fishing spots for black and white crappie fishing year-round. If you’re fishing early in the morning, fish at 10 feet deep, but move deeper into the water as the sun rises and heats the water.

You can catch largemouth bast on cloudy mornings and late evenings. The bass are aggressive here, and will attack topwater lures during the early hours of the day. Carolina rigged soft plastic worms and slow rising jerkbaits are our recommended baits.

Bream will feed readily on small waxworms, grubs, and crickets. They can be found hiding beneath algae and lotus leaves.

The crappie tend to hide near wooden structure and the edge of the creek channels. Live golden shiners and brightly-colored jigs work well for catching crappie.

Catfish season is between early May and mid-July, and stinkbaits are our bait of choice. If you’re feeling bold, however, the Ross Bartlett Reservoir is a great place to go noodling.


Lake Washington

Lake Washington

Lake Washington is a great spot for crappie, bass, catfish, and bream fishing. Largemouth bass are especially active in late spring to summer, and they prefer to swim in waters between 5-13 feet deep in the summer, especially around underwater structures that can offer shade and hiding spots. Plastic lizards, jigs, and spinnerbaits work especially well with bass.

Crappie fishing is a bit slow during the summer. Keep your hook between four to six feet from the surface and bait with jigs and minnows.

There is a steady amount of bluegill in the lake in the summertime, but the fish bite less readily in the winter. Crickets and red worms are an angler’s favorite for catching bream. Cast your line into grass beds close to the shoreline or near the cypresses. They prefer water that is around 5 feet in depth.

Catfish can be tightlined on the lakebed using cutbait, stinkbaits, and nightcrawlers. Channel catfish are abundant, but there is a steady number of flathead catfish as well.


Calling Panther Lake

Calling Panther Lake

Lake Calling Panther is annually stocked with bass, crappie, bream, and catfish, but trophy-sized largemouth bass are the real catch at this lake.

Largemouth bass here are fond of topwater lures like poppers and buzzbaits. To catch crappie, search for them near stumps, in the deeper parts of the water. Live golden shiners are a good choice for crappie bait.

Bream can be found in shallower water, between 4 to 7 feet deep. When the water temperatures rise to the mid-eighties to nineties, the fish swim a bit lower, to a depth of 6 to 9 feet. Crickets and small jigs are the most successful bait for catching bream.

The catfish can be found in deeper water. Nightcrawlers and pungent stinkbaits work well. Catfish can be quite active at night, so try casting out a line at dusk or nightfall.

Lake Calling Panther is annually stocked with bass, crappie, bream, and catfish, but trophy-sized largemouth bass are the real catch at this lake.

Largemouth bass here are fond of topwater lures like poppers and buzzbaits. To catch crappie, search for them near stumps, in the deeper parts of the water. Live golden shiners are a good choice for crappie bait.

Bream can be found in shallower water, between 4 to 7 feet deep. When the water temperatures rise to the mid-eighties to nineties, the fish swim a bit lower, to a depth of 6 to 9 feet. Crickets and small jigs are the most successful bait for catching bream.

The catfish can be found in deeper water. Nightcrawlers and pungent stinkbaits work well. Catfish can be quite active at night, so try casting out a line at dusk or nightfall.


Enid Lake

Enid Lake

Grab your tackle box and head down to Enid Lake if you want to catch crappie, largemouth bass, catfish, gar, or bream. Enid Lake holds the current world record of the largest white crappie, and it holds the Mississippi state record for the heaviest shortnose gar and spotted gar as well. Anglers have been successful using 4- to 6-inch long shiners, minnows, or worms for bait.

 Enid Lake is a popular spot for water-skiing, boating, hunting, and horseback riding. The lake offers several amenities nearby, including campgrounds and local bait and tackle shops. The hunting grounds alone sprawl over 35,000 acres, and you can hunt for deer, turkey, waterfowl, and rabbits.

Grenada Lake

Grenada Lake

Grenada Lake is a popular local fishing spot for largemouth bass, crappie, bream, catfish, and white bass. Largemouth bass trail along water channels, such as streams, rivers, and creeks. They can be lured in using bladed jigs, soft plastics, and spinner baits. During the early morning hours, dusk, and nightfall, fish in the topwaters for the best chances of catching a fish.

During the summer months, crappie are abundant. The larger fish are greedy feeders, and using larger bait with attract larger fish. Crankbaits and minnows have resulted in the greatest catch rate among anglers.

If you’re looking to catch bream, bait with waxworms, grubs, or crickets and cast your line near channel edges around structures such as tree stumps and brushes.

Catfish are fond of worms, while white bass prefer small crankbaits.


Neshoba County Lake

Neshoba County Lake

Neshoba County Lake is a prized fishing location for anglers looking to catch crappie, channel catfish, largemouth bass, redear, and bluegill. The lake sprawls over 138 acres of pristine, American wilderness, and it’s located just 7 miles southeast of Highway 486.

Most of the fish are of a moderate size. Largemouths can weigh in over ten pounds, with the record being a 14.3-pound bass.

The best time to go fishing during the spring, during spawning season. Bass tend to cluster near the shallow water flats and bedding areas. For a relatively small lake, a large percentage of all caught bass weigh in over 8 pounds.


Okhissa Lake

Okhissa Lake, Franklin County

The banks of the Okhissa river are lined with grasslands, bright green algae, and towering evergreen trees. It’s the perfect backdrop for angling on a hot summer’s day.

Okhissa Lake is teeming with largemouth, spotted, and smallmouth bass. You can also catch black crappie, white crappie bluegill, redear sunfish, and channel catfish in its waters.

 We recommend using minnows and swimbaits and following along the banks of the lake near the lilypads and anywhere there are plenty of aquatic plants, algae, and cover for the bass.

Natchez State Park Lake

Natchez State Park Lake

Natchez State Park Lake is home to largemouth bass, bream, crappie, and catfish. We recommend using fishing in shallow waters near wooly structures with junebug and red soft plastic lures that mimic crayfish and shrimp.

In the summer months, the crappie move back down to deeper waters. You can’t go wrong with a chartreuse jig and live minnows to catch crappie.

Bream are abundant in the summer, and they like to bite on tightlined worms and crickets. The bream like to hide near underwater wooden structures such as the base of cabins, and they aren’t afraid to swim through shallow water (4 – 6 feet in depth).

 Catfish are attracted to more pungent choices in bait, and anglers have found great success in tight lining with cut, stink, and blood baits.

Pickwick Lake

Pickwick Lake

Pickwick Lake is an enormous 50,000-acre impoundment, so there is plenty of space for fishing. Pickwick Lake is known for its largemouth, black, smallmouth, and spotted bass fishing, with smallmouths being the dominant fish in its waters.

We recommend using crankbaits and suspending jerkbaits when fishing at this lake. Largemouth bass can be found in the shallows, and they stick close to deep banks and sharp bluff banks. The bass here enjoy eating the plump crawfish as much as locals, and glitter baits that mimic crawfish are very successful at hooking fish. Smallmouths prefer deeper, faster, rockier waters, so cast your line near rocks and boulders if you’re looking for smallmouths.

Pickwick Lake offers a variety of underwater structures and terrains, making it a good fishing spot for all three types of bass.


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