Fishing Vermont

vermont fishing license

GET YOUR VERMONT STATE FISHING LICENSE HERE.

Top 10 Fishing Destinations in Vermont

The state of Vermont is derived from the French “vert mont”, which translates to “green mountain,” but in the autumn and winter, the mountains turn beautiful shades of gold, orange, and red. Vermont is a state with four seasons, and it’s possible to go fishing any season of the year. While spring offers the best fishing experience, fishing in the winter in the winter offers a new set of exciting challenges for more experienced anglers.

Brook trout, northern pike, yellow perch, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, lake trout, Atlantic salmon, rainbow smelt, chain pickerel, white perch, pumpkinseed, rock bass, brown bullhead, shad—the list of fish species that thrive in Vermont’s waters goes on and on.

Here are our top ten fishing spots in Vermont, the Green Mountain State:


Types of Catch Available

Freshwater

Atlantic Salmon

Largemouth Bass

Largemouth Bass

smallmouth bass

Smallmouth Bass

raindbow trout

Rainbow Trout

brown trout

Brown Trout

brook trout

Brook Trout

northern pike

Muskie

walleye

Walleye

bullhead catfish

Bullhead Catfish

Bluegill

Bluegill

yellow perch

Yellow Perch

Crappie

Crappie

Whitefish

Carp

Pumpkinseed Sunfish

Vermont State Fishing Records

Top 10 Fishing Spots Across Vermont

Bullhead Pond

Bullhead Pond

Bullhead Pond in Manchester, Vermont is full of largemouth bass, yellow perch, panfish, and brown bullhead, and the pond is regularly stocked with brook trout. Trout prefer it when the waters aren’t too warm, so try fishing in the spring for trout, before the summer heat settles in.

Bullheads are omnivorous, they prefer to feed at night, and they are not picky eaters, but they are known to have a fondness for nightcrawlers, worms, and chicken livers. They’re a rather large fish, growing close to 2 feet in length, and they tend to stick close to the bottom of the lake.

To get to Bullhead pond, follow Route 7A north from Manchester for about 3.2 miles to reach the driveway that will take you to the northern side of Bullhead Pond.


Echo Lake

Echo Lake

Chain pickerel, lake trout, largemouth bass, pumpkinseed sunfish, bullhead, yellow perch, rainbow trout, smallmouth bass, and rainbow smelt are some of the species that call Echo Lake home. The lake is truly a year-round fishing lake, and it is regularly stocked with trout, though you’ll have the best luck fishing in the springtime.

If you own your own boat, you can launch it, free of charge, at the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Access Area, located on the west shore of the lake. Boat rentals are also readily available.

To reach Echo Lake, take the US Route 4 south on VT Route 100 for 10.5 miles. Once you reach the Echo Lake Inn on your right side, turn left onto Kingdom Road, drive for another 0.6 miles, turn left onto Camp Road, and drive for another 0.5 miles up the road on your left side until you reach Echo Lake.


Gale Meadows

Gale Meadows

Gale Meadows Pond in Londonderry, Vermont offers a great fishing experience for anglers who are looking to catch largemouth bass, rainow trout, chain pickerel, yellow perch, rock bass, or bullhead. Shore fishing and boat fishing are both popular activities at Gale Meadows Pond.

A boat launch ramp is available for anglers, and there is ample parking, for approximately 35 vehicles in the lot.


Lake St. Catherine

Lake St. Catherine

Lake St. Catherine State Park is a 117-acre park located on the shore of Lake St. Catherine. Rowboat, canoe, kayak, and pedal boat rentals are available near the lake, and a boat launch is available. From the lake, you can see the evergreen trees surrounding Lake St. Catherine and Birdseye Mountain.

Some of the species you can catch at the lake include panfish, rainbow trout, brown trout, yellow perch, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, and northern pike. Wildlife, such as white-tailed deer, moose, and waterbirds often stop by the lake for a drink.

 The campground features 50 tent/RV spots, and there is plenty of open space for setting up camp for the night. Other amenities include restrooms, a dump station, picnic areas, swimming areas, a nature center, a snack bar, and even coin-operated hot-water showers!

Shelburne Pond

Shelburne Pond

Shelburne Pond is a 450-acre expanse of water located just 10 miles from downtown Burlington, Vermont. The southwestern side of the pond features a gravel boat ramp for boat, canoe, or kayak fishing, but most anglers just fish from the shoreline.

Cast your line into the water, and you may snag a largemouth bass, brown bullhead, northern pike, yellow perch, black crappie, or panfish. The pond is relatively shallow, with a maximum depth of 25 feet, and the underwater habitat ranges from rocky boulders and gravel banks, to soft, mud-bottom areas with plenty of aquatic vegetation for fish to hide behind and beneath.

If you’re trying to catch largemouth bass, try plastic worms or imitation crayfish, and cast your line near submerged brush. Spinnerbaits and bladed jigs work well in the middle layer of water, while frogs and live minnow work better near the surface. Unlike bullhead, bass are more active hunters, and the key to catching a largemouth is to trigger its hunting instinct.

Rocky ledges, sunken vegetation, and rotting timber give fish a false sense of security, and they are the best places to catch many of the species Shelburne Pond has to offer.


Lowell Lake

Lowell Lake

Lowell Lake State Park, located in Londonderry, Vermont, is a 207-acre park that was established in 1977. Some of the species you’ll find in its waters include largemouth bass, chain pickerel, bullhead, pumpkinseed sunfish, yellow perch, and bullhead.

While boat, canoe, and kayak fishing are allowed, anglers will be happy to know that motorized boats—which may scare away the fish—are prohibited on Lowell Lake. The area surrounding the lake features tall evergreen and deciduous trees that provide ample shade—and, more importantly, the fallen logs and submerged vegetation that fish can hide beneath.


Stoughton Pond

Stoughton Pond

Stoughton Pond in Weathersfield, Vermont offers amenities such as shoreline fishing access, restrooms, and picnic areas for the entire family to enjoy. You’ll find largemouth bass, yellow perch, bullhead, and pumpkinseed sunfish in its waters, and the pond is readily stocked with rainbow trout.

The area surrounding the day use area is relatively flat and treeless, but either side of this area and the opposite shore are covered in dense greenery. Stoughton Pond is located among the gently rolling hills on the Northern Fork of the Black River. A boat ramp is readily available for kayak and boat anglers, as well as flushing toilets and water fountains. If you have any questions, park rangers regularly patrol the area and can provide invaluable fishing advice.


Sadawga Pond

Sadawga Pond

Sadawga Pond offers shoreline fishing and a gravel boat launch for anglers. The pond is readily stocked with largemouth bass, yellow perch, bullhead, chain pickerel, and pumpkinseed sunfish.

The lake spans over 194 acres. It is a very shallow lake, with a maximum depth of 10 feet. Fishing is best in the springtime, but Sadawga is truly a year-round fishing lake. During the snowy season, the roads leading up to Sadawga Pond are plowed to allow cars to access the lake. The landscape surrounding the lake is dotted with trees, and the shoreline is mostly grassy.

To access Sadawga Pond, if you’re coming from Brattlebro, go west on Route 9 for approximately 17.5 miles, then turn left onto Route 100. Drive down Route 100 for about 6.1 miles, and then turn onto Sadawga Road, on your left.


Baker Pond

Baker Pond

Baker Pond, located in beautiful Brookfield, Vermont, is a great fishing spot for shore and boat fishing. Largemouth bass and pumpkinseed sunfish are the most dominant species in this pond, but the pond is also regularly stocked with brook trout by the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department.

The department owns the pond, and keeps it well-kept. To access Baker Pond, take exit 5 off of Interstate 89. Drive west on Route 64 for about 3 miles, then turn left onto Route 12. Keep driving for 4.1 miles, until you see the Baker Pond access area, located on the right side of the road.


FUN & COOL STUFF

FISHING CHALLENGE

FUN QUIZZES

FRESHWATER POND

SALTWATER BAY

RESOURCES

FISHING CHARTERS

FISHING LODGES

HOTEL BOOKING

CHEAP AIRFARE

INFORMATION

ADVERTISING

PRIVACY

ABOUT US

CONTACT US

TERMS OF USE

SHARING IS CARING

Visit Us

FishingVacations.com Copyright 2019

Terms of Use

>